Cover image for Continuity and Anachronism Parliamentary and Constitutional Development in Whig Historiography and in the Anti-Whig Reaction Between 1890 and 1930
Title:
Continuity and Anachronism Parliamentary and Constitutional Development in Whig Historiography and in the Anti-Whig Reaction Between 1890 and 1930
Author:
Blaas, P. B. M. author.
ISBN:
9789400997127
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
XVII, 441 p. online resource.
Series:
International Archives of the History of Ideas/Archives Internationales d’Histoire des Idees, 91
Contents:
I. The Presuppositions of Whig Historical Writing -- A. The ‘pre-Namier’ period and the growing criticism of the features of Whig historical interpretation: anachronism, finalism and historical continuity -- B. The Relativization of Constitutional History -- II. Whig Historiography in the Nineteenth Century. A. Myth about a Myth? -- A. Medieval studies in the first half of the nineteenth century: F. Palgrave, J. Allen and H. Hallam -- B. The Glorious Revolution and George III; Cromwell and the Civil War -- C. Medieval studies in the second half of the nineteenth century: The Oxford School: W. Stubbs, E.A. Freeman and J.R. Green -- III. Tradition Discredited -- A. The Crisis within the House of Commons -- B. Old liberalism as conservative realism -- C. Whiggery versus Gladstonian liberalism -- D. The New Liberalism: idealism and realism. Efficiency used as an ideology against tradition -- IV. Law and History: F. W. Maitland -- A. Maitland’s road to History -- B. Law and History incompatible? -- C. Maitland versus anachronisms -- V. A Liberal Revaluation of the Tudor Monarchy: A.F. Pollard -- A. A.F. Pollard and English historiography -- B. A Liberal Revaluation of the New Monarchy: English Freedom and its Fettered Birth -- C. Parliament’s unparliamentary origin and evolution -- D. Tollardism’: The Reformation Parliament -- VI. Administrative History: T.F. Tout -- A. Administrative history as a reaction to Whig historiography -- B. Administrative history: a mirror of the times -- C. T.F. Tout and the French Histoire Événementielle -- D. T.F. Tout and his Administrative History -- E. The Reaction: the limits of administrative history and the illusions of specialization -- Bibliography of A.F. Pollard’s Writings -- Sources and literature -- Index of Names -- Index of Subjects.
Abstract:
Several ofthe themes of this study have been treated in earlier publica­ tions, some by means of a general analysis and some through a detailed handling of problems raised by a particular theme or historian. Both the more general theoretical treatment of the theme and the concrete historiographical treatment are, I think, indispensable aids to the proper understanding of the development of historical scholarship in nineteenth-and twentieth-century England. There are a number of problems in a concrete historiographical approach: there is first the mass of historians to be faced, and then the immense amount of historical themes dealt with in various periods. As a guideline through the tangle of themes we chose the historiography on the development of the English parliament. We can only hope that we have made a responsible choice of the historians concerned. Un­ fortunately it was not always possible for us to give extensive biogra­ phies of some of the more recent historians, as several 'papers' are still firmly in the possession of families, and a number of them mus- despite of years - still be labelled 'confidential.' The Pollard Papers in the London Institute of Historical Research thus remained inaccessible. Fortunately the lack was partly compen­ sated by some important material being found apart from these Papers.
Added Corporate Author:
Holds:
Copies:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Item Barcode
Call Number
Shelf Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
eBook ER108620 D1 -DX301 Electronic Resources
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Several ofthe themes of this study have been treated in earlier publica­ tions, some by means of a general analysis and some through a detailed handling of problems raised by a particular theme or historian. Both the more general theoretical treatment of the theme and the concrete historiographical treatment are, I think, indispensable aids to the proper understanding of the development of historical scholarship in nineteenth-and twentieth-century England. There are a number of problems in a concrete historiographical approach: there is first the mass of historians to be faced, and then the immense amount of historical themes dealt with in various periods. As a guideline through the tangle of themes we chose the historiography on the development of the English parliament. We can only hope that we have made a responsible choice of the historians concerned. Un­ fortunately it was not always possible for us to give extensive biogra­ phies of some of the more recent historians, as several 'papers' are still firmly in the possession of families, and a number of them mus- despite of years - still be labelled 'confidential.' The Pollard Papers in the London Institute of Historical Research thus remained inaccessible. Fortunately the lack was partly compen­ sated by some important material being found apart from these Papers.