Cover image for International relations the basics
Title:
International relations the basics
Author:
Sutch, Peter, 1971-
ISBN:
9780203960936
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Publication Information:
Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon ; New York : Routledge, 2007.
Physical Description:
1 online resource (viii, 214 p. ): ill.
Contents:
The nature of IR -- Anarchy and the origin of the modern international system : world politics 1648-1939 -- Realism : the basics -- Liberalism : the basics -- Challenging anarchy : building world politics -- Criticizing world politics -- Reconfiguring world politics : globalisation -- From stability to justice? : contemporary challenges in international relations.
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Summary

Summary

International Relations is a concise and accessible introduction for students new to international relations and for the general reader. It offers the most up-to-date guide to the major issues and areas of debate and:

explains key issues including humanitarian intervention and economic justice features illustrative and familiar case studies from around the world examines topical debates on globalization and terrorism provides an overview of the discipline to situate the new reader at the heart of the study of global politics

Covering all the basics and more, this is the ideal book for anyone who wants to understand contemporary international relations.


Table of Contents

Introduction
Part 1 Conflict, Competition and Compromise: Basic Elements of International Relations
1 Anarchy and the Origin of IR
2 Thinking about Self-Interest
3 Mitigating Anarchy: Building World Politics
4 Thinking about World Politics
5 Criticizing World Politics Review and Conclusions to Part 1
Part 2 Globalization and Interdependence: Shared Problems Need Shared Solutions
6 The Progress of World Politics
7 Thinking about Globalization
8 Threats to Interdependence Review and Conclusions to Part 2