Cover image for Ethics, justice, and international relations : constructing an international community
Title:
Ethics, justice, and international relations : constructing an international community
Author:
Sutch, Peter, 1971-
ISBN:
9780415232746
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Routledge, 2001.
Physical Description:
224 p. ; 25 cm + 1 online resource
Series:
Routledge advances in international relations and global politics ; 13

Routledge advances in international relations and politics ; 13.
Electronic Access:
Click here to view
Holds:
Copies:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Item Barcode
Call Number
Shelf Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
eBook ER129393 JZ1306 .S88 2001 Electronic Resources
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This topical and timely book critically explores contemporary liberal international relations theory. In the fifty years since the declaration of human rights, the language of international relations has come to incorporate the language of justice and injustice. The book argues that if justice is to become the governing principle of international politics, then liberals must recognise that their political preferences cannot be the preconditions of global ethics. The hierarchy of international political ethics must be constructed afresh so that the first principles of justice are accessible to all agents as political and ethical equals.
This book will be essential reading for students and scholars in politics, international relations, political theory and ethics.


Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Setting the Scene
International Relations as Political Theory
2 Cosmopolitanism and Critical Cosmopolitanism
3 Developmental communitarianism: liberal Ambitions, Secular Approaches
4 Critical Constructivism: Onora O'Neill on Moral and Institutional Cosmopolitanism
5 Secular Hegelianism: Frost and the Limits of Developmental communitarianism
6 Michael Walzer: Moral Creativity and the Minimalist Universalism of Reiteration
7 John Rawls, Developmental Communitarianism and International Ethics
Conclusion