Cover image for New perspectives on liberal peacebuilding
Title:
New perspectives on liberal peacebuilding
Author:
Newman, Edward, 1970-
ISBN:
9789280871432
Publication Information:
Tokyo ; New York : United Nations University Press, ©2009.
Physical Description:
1 online resource (xi, 392 pages)
Contents:
Introduction / "Liberal" peacebuilding debates / Beyond liberal peace? Responses to "backsliding" / Towards life welfare / Does liberal peacebuildinjg have a future / Transitional justice and the liberal peace / A critique of the political economy of the liberal peace : elements of an African eperience / Earth calling the liberals : locating the political culture of Sierra Leone as the terrain for "reform" / Afghanistan : justice sector reform / Peacebuilding in Bosnia-Herzegovina : reflections on the development-democracy link / "We just take what they offer" : community rempowerment in post-war Timor-Leste / The making of Sri Lanka's post-conflict economic package and the failure of the 2001-2004 peace process / Beware of liberal peacebuilders bearing gifts : the deviancy of liberal peace in Palestine and Israel / Liberal interventions, illiberal outcomes : the United Nations, western powers and Lebanon / Re-examining liberal peacebuilding in light of realism and pragmatism : the Cambodian experience / Revisiting the "liberal peace" thesis applied to Central America : new insights for and against the Wilsonian approach
Abstract:
Peacebuilding in conflict-prone or post-conflict countries -- such as East Timor, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Sierra Leone -- aims to prevent the re-emergence or escalation of violent conflict and establish a durable peace. This volume explores and critiques the 'liberal' premise of contemporary peacebuilding: the promotion of democracy, market-based economic reforms and a range of other institutions associated with 'modern' states as a driving force for building peace. Whilst focusing mainly upon cases of major UN peacebuilding, it also considers the implications and record of liberal peacebuilding through a wider range of experiences. It goes beyond the narrow focus on democracy and market economics by interrogating a wider area of peacebuilding activities, including the (re)construction of state institutions.--Publisher's description.

Africa; Sierra Leone; Afghanistan; Bosnia-Herzegovina; Timor-Leste; Sri Lanka; Palestine; Israel; United Nations; Lebanon; Cambodia; Central America.
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Summary

Summary

Peacebuilding in conflict-prone or post-conflict countries OCo such as East Timor, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Sierra Leone OCo aims to prevent the re-emergence or escalation of violent conflict and establish a durable peace. This volume explores and critiques the OCyliberalOCO premise of contemporary peacebuilding: the promotion of democracy, market-based economic reforms and a range of other institutions associated with OCymodernOCO states as a driving force for building peace. If a liberal peace is viable, is it also legitimate? Or is it, as some claim, a new form of hegemonic control or neo-imperialism? What is the relationship between statebuilding, liberal peacebuilding and the more emancipatory agendas of peacebuilding? Insofar as peacebuilding resembles statebuilding, what or whose vision of the state is being promoted? Is peacebuilding a realist strategic enterprise meant to contain conflict and its international repercussions, or can it resolve the underlying sources of conflict and engage with grassroots actors and issues? Should it address objectives such as emancipation and social justice, and if so how?New Perspectives on Liberal Peacebuilding provides fresh insights into these debates. Whilst focusing mainly upon cases of major UN peacebuilding, it also considers the implications and record of liberal peacebuilding through a wider range of experiences. It goes beyond the narrow focus on democracy and market economics by interrogating a wider area of peacebuilding activities, including the (re)construction of state institutions. It applies OCycriticalOCO analysis to the study of peacebuilding, exploring the implications of peacebuilding activities for broader debates about power, legitimacy and international order. It also takes the debate beyond the realms of liberal Western academia by involving scholars and analysts from conflict-prone and post-conflict societies.