Cover image for Towards an ethics of community negotiations of difference in a pluralist society
Title:
Towards an ethics of community negotiations of difference in a pluralist society
Author:
Olthuis, James H.
ISBN:
9780889206601
Publication Information:
Waterloo, Ont. : Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion = Corporation canadienne des sciences religeuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2000 (Baltimore, Md. : Project Muse 2012) (Baltimore, Md. : Project MUSE, 2015)
Physical Description:
1 online resource (1 electronic text (ix, 226 p.) :) ill., digital file.
Series:
Comparative ethics series ; v. 5

UPCC book collections on Project MUSE.

Comparative ethics series ; v. 5.
General Note:
Issued as part of UPCC book collections on Project MUSE.
Contents:
Plotting the margins : a historical episode in the management of social plurality / Robert Sweetman -- Consequences of liberalism : ideological domination in Rorty's public/private split / Hendrik Hart -- Indoctrination and assimilation in plural settings / Ken Badley -- "Woman" in the plural : negotiating sameness and difference in feminist theory / Janet Catherina Wesselius -- Religious conflicts, public policy, and moral authority : reflections on Christian faith and homosexual rights in a plural society / Hendrik Hart -- Rethinking the family : belonging, respecting, and connecting / James H. Olthuis -- Female genital mutilation : an examination of a harmful traditional practice in a Canadian context / Lisa Chisholm-Smith -- Violent asymmetry : the shape of power in the current debate over morality of homosexuality / Ronald A. Kuipers -- Native self-government : between the spiritual fire and the political fire / George Vandervelde -- On identity and aesthetic voice of the culturally displaced / Calvin Seerveld.
Abstract:
This collection of significant essays suggests that to truly honour differences in matters of faith and religion we must publicly exercise and celebrate them. The secular/sacred, public/private divisions long considered sacred in the West need to be dismantled if Canada (or any nation state) is to develop a genuine mosaic that embraces fundamental differences instead of a melting pot that marginalizes. An ethics of difference starts with a recognition of difference, not as deviance or deficit that threatens but as otherness to connect with, cherish, and celebrate. The book begins with the suggestion that our inability to come to terms with social plurality is not fundamentally the fault of religious differences, and that a public/private split inadequately deals with matters of basic difference. It then explores how encouraging people to live out their respective faiths may open new possibilities for respectful, honourable, and just negotiations of contemporary dilemmas arising out of the multicultural fabric of Canadian life. Towards an Ethics of Community introduces readers to some of the most challenging and divisive dilemmas we face in this increasingly pluralistic, postmodern world; issues such as family and domestic violence, Aboriginal rights, homosexuality and public policy, and female genital mutilation. This is a book truly global in scope and significance.
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Summary

Summary

How do we deal with difference personally, interpersonally, nationally? Can we weave a cohesive social fabric in a religiously plural society without suppressing differences?

This collection of significant essays suggests that to truly honour differences in matters of faith and religion we must publicly exercise and celebrate them. The secular/sacred, public/private divisions long considered sacred in the West need to be dismantled if Canada (or any nation state) is to develop a genuine mosaic that embraces fundamental differences instead of a melting pot that marginalizes. An ethics of difference starts with a recognition of difference, not as deviance or deficit that threatens but as otherness to connect with, cherish, and celebrate.

The book begins with the suggestion that our inability to come to terms with social plurality is not fundamentally the fault of religious differences, and that a public/private split inadequately deals with matters of basic difference. It then explores how encouraging people to live out their respective faiths may open new possibilities for respectful, honourable, and just negotiations of contemporary dilemmas arising out of the multicultural fabric of Canadian life.

Towards an Ethics of Community introduces readers to some of the most challenging and divisive dilemmas we face in this increasingly pluralistic, postmodern world -- issues such as family and domestic violence, Aboriginal rights, homosexuality and public policy, and female genital mutilation. This is a book truly global in scope and significance.