Cover image for From the Local to the Global Theories and Key Issues in Global Justice
Title:
From the Local to the Global Theories and Key Issues in Global Justice
Author:
Quist-Adade, Charles. author.
ISBN:
9789463008396
Physical Description:
XX, 360 p. online resource.
Contents:
Preface -- Arrangement of This Book -- Introduction -- Knowledge, Knowing, and Social Justice -- Knowledge, Power, and Powerlessness.-Types of Knowledge -- Knowing: Knowledge Acquisition -- Sources of Knowledge -- Ways of Knowing; What Is Indigenous Knowledge? -- Functions of IK -- Who Are the Indigenous People? -- Western System of Knowledge.-Common Grounds -- What Is Critical Thinking? Why Do We Need It?.-Defining Critical Thinking -- Characteristics of Critical Thinking.-Characteristics of the Critical Thinker -- Critical Sociological Thinking -- Critical Theory and Critical Sociology -- What Is Critical Sociology? -- A Brief History of Critical Sociology -- Critical Sociology, the Sociological Consciousness and Sociological Imagination -- Critical Thinking Toolkit -- Operative Concepts and Recurring Themes -- Intersectionality -- Positionality -- Types of Ideologies -- The Sociological Imagination -- From the Local to the Global, From the Global to the Local -- Theory of the Duality of Structure and Agency -- Anthony Giddens’ Structuration -- Social Reality Construction and Global Social Justice; Social Constructionist Theory: Vygotsky’s Seminal Work; Corporate Crime and Street Crime -- The Sociological Imagination and Justice in Local and Global Contexts.-Social Justice and the Social Construction of Inequality and Difference -- Two Types of Privilege -- The Essentialist Orientations versus Constructionist Orientations -- The Social Construction of Difference -- Types of Oppression -- How Do We Construct the ‘Other’?.-Invalidation Myths -- Invalidation Ideologies: Weapons of Discrimination, Subordination and Extermination -- Stereotyping, Prejudicing, and Framing; Prejudice, Ignorance and Stereotyping; The Sociology of Human Rights and Social Justice -- Obstacles to Becoming ‘Good’ -- The Human Rights Approach -- Collective versus Individual Rights -- Foundation of Human Rights -- Central Tenets of the Human Rights Approach -- The Development of International Human Rights Covenants -- Debate over the Universality of Human Rights -- Murumba’s Model of Human Rights -- Human Rights and Human Obligations -- Justifiable Restrictions -- What Is Social Justice? -- The History of the “Social” in Social Justice -- Definitions -- Basic Principles of Justice in the Just Society -- Social Justice and Human Rights -- Kinds of Rights -- Divisions and Types of Justice -- The Laws of Social Justice -- Characteristics of Social Justice -- Theories of Social Justice -- The Sociological Foundations of Social Justice -- The Contribution of Emile Durkheim (1858–1917) -- Relationship between Crime, Law and Social Solidarity -- Transition in Types of Justice.-Mechanical Solidarity; Collective Conscience; The Contribution of Karl Marx -- Karl Marx and His Critique of Capitalism; Forces and Relations of Production -- Neo-Marxist Theorists and Social Structure.-Contribution of Herbert Spencer (1820–1903): Evolutionism and the Survival of the Fittest -- The Contribution of Max Weber -- Types of Rationality -- The Irrationality of Rationality -- Comparing Marx to Weber -- Political Theories of Social Justice -- Sources of Social Justice -- Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679) -- Social Contract; John Locke (1632–1704) -- The Sanctity of Private Property -- Political Society.-Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712–1778) -- Contemporary Theories of Social Justice -- Communitarian Concept of Justice -- The Right Based Theory of John Rawls -- The Principles of Justice -- Justice as Fairness: Rawls’ Social Contract Theory -- Rawls’ Distributive Justice Theory -- Rawls’ Principle of Redress -- Walzer’s Communitarian Theory of Social Justice; Social Goods -- The Theory of Complex Equality -- Gender Theories of Justice -- Feminism -- Goals of Feminism -- The Waves of Feminism -- First Wave -- Second Wave -- Third Wave -- Theoretical Schools of Feminism -- Marxist/Socialist Feminism -- Radical Feminism -- Black Feminism -- Summary -- Queer Theory -- Post/Anti-Colonial, Anti-Racist Theories of Justice -- Introduction -- Theorizing the Effects of Colonialism, Imperialism, and Capitalist Relations: Modernization, Dependency, and World-System Theories -- Modernization Theory.-Dependency Theory -- The Modern World-System Theory -- Postcolonialism.-Franz Fanon -- From Neo-Colonialism to Neo-Liberal Globalization.-Proposed Solutions -- Critical Race Theory -- Critical Race Theory and the Mechanism of Denial -- Postmodern Theories of Social Justice.-Postmodernism -- Postmodernity and Postmodernism -- Critique of Postmodernism -- The Poststructuralism of Pierre Bourdieu and Michel Foucault -- Michel Foucault -- Madness and Reason -- Prohibited Words.-Will to Truth -- Discourse and Power -- Pierre Bourdieu -- Economic Theories of Social Justice -- Economic Justice and Capitalism-Socialism Divide -- Principles of Capitalism -- Critique of Capitalism.-Positivities of Capitalism -- Keynesian State/Corporate Capitalism (1930s–1970s): The Era of Intense Social, Cultural, Economic, and Political Changes -- Militarization of the World: Military Industrial Complex, Educational Security State, National Security State, and Industrial-Consumer Society; Neo-Liberal/Corporate Capitalism (1960s-Present); Socialism; Principles of Socialism; The Role of Government.-Welfare State; The Rise of the Welfare State; Globalization and Social Justice -- Globalization, Glocalism, and Glocalization -- Distinguishing between Globalism and Globalization -- The Four Dimensions of Globalization -- Globalization from the Above and Globalization from the Below -- Economic Globalization -- Political Globalization -- Cultural Globalization -- Supporters of Globalization.-Detractors of Globalization -- The Ideology of Globalization: The Neo-Liberal Discourse -- Characteristics of Neo-Liberalism -- Are Neo-Liberal Policies Hegemonic? -- The History of Globalization.-Globalization and Global (In)Justice; Women, Slavery and Poverty; Health -- Hunger, Malnutrition and Famine -- Growth -- The Global Economy -- Debt Crisis (1982 to Present) -- Neoliberal Diagnosis.-Neoliberal Prescription -- Failed Growth Policies -- Revised Poverty Agenda – 1990 -- Alternative Global Equity Agenda – 2005 -- The Role of Transnational Corporation in Globalization and the Social Justice Agenda; Neo-Liberal Discourse as a Defense Global Corporatization -- The Global Tentacles of Colonialism, Neocolonialism and Neoliberal Globalization -- The Global Economy; Debt Crisis (1982 to Present) -- Neoliberal Prescription -- Failed Growth Policies.-Alternative Global Equity Agenda – 2005 -- The Role of Transnational Corporation in Globalization and the Social Justice Agenda -- Race, Racialization and Racism; Does Race Matter?; The Myth of “Race” and the Reality of Racism; What Is “Race”? What Is Racialization? What Is Racism?; The Social-Historical Construction of Race -- Race as a Modern Idea; Futile Attempts at Classification of “Races” -- In the Eye of the Beholder: Your “Black” Person Is My “White” Person -- Debunking “Race”: We’re All Mongrels! -- Darwin, Smith, and Spencer: Race, Europe and Social Darwinism; Christianity, Eurocentrism and Race -- Racism Continues to Thrive -- What Is Racism? -- Old versus New Racism -- New Racism -- Forms of Racism Today -- The New Racisms: Racism in the 21st Century -- Combating Racism through Education and Praxis -- Why Does Racism Persist When Many People Know It’s Bad? -- Conclusion -- Epilogue -- Global Human Relations and Social Justice -- Appendix -- Glossary of Key Terms -- References.
Abstract:
"“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” – Martin Luther King Jr. “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Mahatma Gandhi “Thought without practice is blind; practice without thought is empty.” –Kwame Nkrumah These quotes aptly capture the spirit, the essence, and reach of this book. From the Local to the Global: Theories and Key Issues in Global Social Justice explores and explains the relationships between social justice as it is conceived, constructed, understood and implemented locally and globally. It does so by examining social justice from a theoretical and substantive perspective. It takes the perspective that social justice is a multifaceted, dialectical, intersectional, and cross-cultural phenomenon with both local and global interfaces and implications. The book is based on four premises: (1) Global Social Justice (GSJ) recognizes the commonality of the human condition. (2) GSJ is a deeply and inextricably a local and global phenomenon; one cannot exist in isolation from the other. In other words, the promotion or denial of social justice locally has both immediate and remote/future implications globally. The reverse is equally true; social justice promoted or demoted in a far flung corner of the world devalues social justice at home. (3) GSJ is transnational, transcending national and cultural boundaries. (4) GSJ is both a domestic and global normative imperative recognizing interstices of race, gender, class, sexuality, age, and (dis)ability. The author argues that the overriding problem of global inequality must be addressed as a necessary condition for solving problems of health care, debt, racism, homophobia, sexism, ageism, terrorism, and other critical issues facing citizens nationally and globally. In addition, the author posits that real-world solutions to social problems, be they local or global require collective global efforts.".
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