Cover image for Imperial Odessa : people, spaces, identities
Title:
Imperial Odessa : people, spaces, identities
Author:
Sifneos, Evrydiki, author.
ISBN:
9789004313606
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
x, 286 pages ; 24 cm
Series:
Urasian studies library ; Volume 8

Urasian studies library ; v.8.
Contents:
Foreword -- Introduction: of peripatetic and other approaches to Odessa's history -- Mobility and ethnic plurality -- Toward a consumer society : tastes, markets and political liberalism -- Merchants, middlemen and entrepreneurs : the driving forces of Odessa's economy -- The spring time of the public sphere -- The two sides of the moon : ethnic clashes and tolerance in a cosmopolitan city -- The end of a cosmopolitan port-city.
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Book 0346495 HT145.U38 S54 2018 Central Campus Library
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Summary

Summary

Imperial Odessa: Peoples, Spaces, Identities is a book about a cosmopolitan city written by a cosmopolitan scholar with a literary flair. Evrydiki Sifneos conceives Odessa as more of a fin-de si cle east Mediterranean port-metropolis than as a provincial port-city of the Russian Empire in the nineteenth century due to two of its principal characteristics: its function as a hub of international trade and travel, and the multi-ethnic character of its inhabitants. The book unfolds around two interpenetrating axes. The first one introduces a new "peripatetic" approach that discovers the space of the city; and the other, the one that has given it its dynamic, is the socio-economic transformations that germinated within the political changes.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. ix
Introduction: Of Peripatetic and Other Approaches to Odessa's Historyp. 1
1 The Peripatetic Approachp. 3
2 The Socio-economic Approachp. 11
1 Port: Mobility and Ethnic Pluralismp. 20
1 Port-City Identities and Cosmopolitanismp. 27
2 Enlightened Administratorsp. 30
3 The People of the Portp. 33
4 Influences from Without and Withinp. 36
5 The Connectedness of Odessap. 38
6 Travel Destination and Relayp. 40
7 The 1897 Demographic Snapshotp. 42
8 Residential Porosity; The Mikhel'son Apartment Building in Aleksandrovskii Districtp. 49
9 Images, Representations, Comparisonsp. 51
2 Toward a Consumer Society: Tastes, Markets and Political Liberalismp. 57
1 The Rise of a Consumer Societyp. 58
2 Marketsp. 59
3 Provisioning the Cityp. 66
4 Profile of the Merchant-Entrepreneurs Involved in Foreign Trade and Their Specialisationsp. 67
5 Patterns of Successful Businessp. 72
6 The Evolution of Markets in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Centuryp. 75
7 Political Liberalism: The Parallel Activity of the Union of Welfare and the Greek Secret Societyp. 79
8 Imagining Greece's Independence in Odessa's Greek Marketp. 81
9 History of the Philiki Etaireiap. 84
10 Facilitating Factors for Political Fermentationp. 87
11 The Commercial Outlook of the Greek Society of Friendsp. 92
3 Merchants and Entrepreneurs: The Driving Forces of Odessa's Economyp. 99
1 Industry in Odessap. 102
2 Types of Entrepreneurs and Strategiesp. 109
3 The Port and the Exporterp. 112
4 Middlemen: The Period of Transitionp. 117
5 Real Estate Owners in Odessap. 121
6 The Diversified Entrepreneurp. 124
7 The "Political" Entrepreneurp. 127
8 At the Commercial Courtp. 130
9 Transcending Communal Boundaries in Capital Raisingp. 137
4 The Springtime of the Public Spherep. 145
1 Public Spacesp. 145
2 Civil Society?p. 150
3 Associations, Societies, Professional Societiesp. 151
4 Workers' Associationsp. 156
5 Ethnic Minority Associationsp. 158
6 Charity as a Culturep. 160
7 An Example of Commercial Charity: The Greek Benevolent Association of Odessap. 161
8 Towards a Longed-for Multi-Ethnic Society: Odessa 1907-1914p. 163
5 The Two Sides of the Moon: Ethnic Clashes and Tolerance in a Cosmopolitan Cityp. 173
1 Co-existence and Tolerance in the Upper Classesp. 174
2 Rivalry in the Middle Classesp. 176
3 Separation and Conflict in the Lower Stratap. 179
4 Crisis Management and the Responsibilities of the Local Authoritiesp. 186
5 Stereotypesp. 189
6 Impact of the Pogroms and Civic Drawbacksp. 196
7 Non-ethnic Violencep. 199
6 The End of a Cosmopolitan Port-Cityp. 206
1 Aftermath: The Four Storiesp. 211
2 Politicization during the School Yearsp. 214
2.1 Gymnasia Militancyp. 215
2.2 Acquaintancesp. 215
2.3 The Illegal Literaturep. 217
3 Between Judicial Responsibility, Passion for Music and Revolutionp. 217
3.1 1918 - Law Service, Music and German Occupationp. 218
3.2 1919 - Farewell to the Violoncellop. 220
4 Between War and Revolutionp. 221
4.1 The February Revolutionp. 221
4.2 The October Revolutionp. 223
4.3 The Bolsheviks in Odessa (January-March 1918)p. 224
4.4 Odessa under Austro-German Occupation (March-November 1918)p. 224
4.5 The Allied Intervention (French and Greeks in Odessa)-December 1918-March 1919p. 227
4.6 The Departurep. 228
5 At the Gen Factory in Peresyp'p. 229
5.1 Ideology and Workers' Demands in 1917p. 230
5.2 The Battle for the Eight-Hour Workdayp. 230
5.3 Bombshells into Ploughsharesp. 231
5.4 At Odessa's Companiesp. 233
5.5 The "Sale" of the Factoryp. 234
6 Peoples and Identitiesp. 234
7 Epiloguep. 236
Appendixp. 239
Bibliographyp. 254
Index of Namesp. 276
Index of Placesp. 279
Index of Subjectsp. 280