Cover image for Colonial capitalism and the dilemmas of liberalism
Title:
Colonial capitalism and the dilemmas of liberalism
Author:
Ince, Onur Ulas, author.
ISBN:
9780190637293
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
x, 216 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents:
Colonial captialism and the dilemmas of liberalism -- In the beginning, all the world was America -- Not a partnership in pepper, coffee, calico, or tobacco -- Letters from Sydney.
Abstract:
"By the mid-nineteenth century, Britain celebrated its possession of a unique "empire of liberty" that propagated the rule of private property, free trade, and free labor across the globe. The British also knew that their empire had been built by conquering overseas territories, trading slaves, and extorting tribute from other societies. Set in the context of the early-modern British Empire, Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism paints a striking picture of these tensions between the illiberal origins of capitalism and its liberal imaginations in metropolitan thought. Onur Ulas Ince combines an analysis of political economy and political theory to examine the impact of colonial economic relations on the development of liberal thought in Britain. He shows how a liberal self-image for the British Empire was constructed in the face of the systematic expropriation, exploitation, and servitude that built its transoceanic capitalist economy. The resilience of Britain's self-image was due in large part to the liberal intellectuals of empire, such as John Locke, Edmund Burke, and Edward Gibbon Wakefield, and their efforts to disavow the violent transformations that propelled British colonial capitalism. Ince forcefully demonstrates that liberalism as a language of politics was elaborated in and through the political economic debates around the contested meanings of private property, market exchange, and free labor. Weaving together intellectual history, critical theory, and colonial studies, this book is a bold attempt to reconceptualize the historical relationship between capitalism, liberalism, and empire in a way that continues to resonate with our present moment."--
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Summary

Summary

By the mid-nineteenth century, Britain celebrated its possession of a unique "empire of liberty" that propagated the rule of private property, free trade, and free labor across the globe. The British also knew that their empire had been built by conquering overseas territories, trading slaves,and extorting tribute from other societies. Set in the context of the early-modern British Empire, Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism paints a striking picture of these tensions between the illiberal origins of capitalism and its liberal imaginations in metropolitan thought.Onur Ulas Ince combines an analysis of political economy and political theory to examine the impact of colonial economic relations on the development of liberal thought in Britain. He shows how a liberal self-image for the British Empire was constructed in the face of the systematic expropriation,exploitation, and servitude that built its transoceanic capitalist economy. The resilience of Britain's self-image was due in large part to the liberal intellectuals of empire, such as John Locke, Edmund Burke, and Edward Gibbon Wakefield, and their efforts to disavow the violent transformationsthat propelled British colonial capitalism. Ince forcefully demonstrates that liberalism as a language of politics was elaborated in and through the political economic debates around the contested meanings of private property, market exchange, and free labor.Weaving together intellectual history, critical theory, and colonial studies, this book is a bold attempt to reconceptualize the historical relationship between capitalism, liberalism, and empire in a way that continues to resonate with our present moment.


Table of Contents

John Locke's Global Theory of PropertyEdmund Burke and the Vicissitudes of Imperial CommerceEdward Gibbon Wakefield and the Problem of Colonial Labor
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Liberalism and Empire in a New Keyp. 1
Liberalism, Capitalism, and Empirep. 2
Structure of the Bookp. 7
Ways Forwardp. 9
1 Colonial Capitalism and the Dilemmas of Liberalism: Framing an Inquiryp. 13
Liberalism and Empire: Rematerializing Afieldp. 14
New Dilemmas of Liberalismp. 24
Conclusion: Stereoscopic View of Historyp. 34
2 In the Beginning, All the World Was Americap. 38
Locke And The Atlanticp. 40
Money And Morality Of Accumulationp. 47
Money, Possession, And Dispossessionp. 55
Conclusion: Beyond Possessive Individualismp. 69
3 Not a Partnership in Pepper, Coffee, Calico, or Tobaccop. 74
Empire and Commercial Capitalism in Indiap. 77
Burke's Commercial Idealp. 88
Imperious Commercep. 95
Burke's "Peculiar Universalism" Revisitedp. 102
Conclusion: Imperial Frontiersmen, Gentlemanly Capitalistsp. 110
4 Letters from Sydneyp. 113
Political Labor Problem: The Metropolep. 117
Economic Labor Problem: The Colonyp. 127
Systematic Colonization: Capital and Empirep. 139
Conclusion: The Empire Of Libertyp. 154
Conclusion: Bringing the Economy Back Inp. 158
Notesp. 165
Indexp. 205