Cover image for Canada's origins: Liberal, Tory, or Republican?
Title:
Canada's origins: Liberal, Tory, or Republican?
Author:
Ajzenstat, Janet, 1936-
ISBN:
9780886292744
Publication Information:
Ottawa : Carleton University Press, 1995.
Physical Description:
288 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series:
The Carleton library ;
Contents:
Part I: Canada's Origins in New Perspective. Liberal-Republicanism: The Revisionist Picture of Canada's Founding / Janet Ajzenstat and Peter J. Smith -- Part II: The Tory Paradigm. Conservatism, Liberalism, and Socialism in Canada: An Interpretation / Gad Horowitz -- Part III: Republican Influence. The Ideological Origins of Canadian Confederation / Peter J. Smith. The First Distinct Society: French Canada, America, and the Constitution of 1791 / Louis-Georges Harvey. Civic Humanism Versus Liberalism: Fitting the Loyalists In / Peter J. Smith -- Part IV: Liberal Roots. Durham and Robinson: Political Faction and Moderation / Janet Ajzenstat. The Triumph of Liberalism in Canada: Laurier on Representation and Party Government / Rainer Knopff. Egerton Ryerson's Canadian Liberalism / Colin D. Pearce. The Constitutionalism of Etienne Parent and Joseph Howe / Janet Ajzenstat. The Provincial Rights Movement: Tensions Between Liberty and Community in Legal Liberalism / Robert C. Vipond.
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Summary

Summary

Ajzenstat and Smith challenge the idea of Canada as a country whose liberal individualism, unlike that of the United States, is redeemed by a tradition of government intervention in economic and social life: the so-called "tory touch." This ground-breaking book begins with the now classic article in which the red tory view was formulated. It then presents a new and illuminating picture of Canadian political life, in which liberal individualism confronts not toryism but the participatory tradition of civic republicanism. In the final section the two editors, one a liberal, the other a civic republican, debate the crucial questions dominating Canadian politics today-including Quebec's search for recognition-from the perspective of their shared understanding of Canada's founding.