Cover image for The later works, 1925-1953
Title:
The later works, 1925-1953
Author:
Dewey, John, 1859-1952
ISBN:
9780809314904

9780809314911

9780809314935

9780809315741

9780809315758

9780809315765

9780809315772

9780809315789

9780809316779

9780809316809

9780809316816

9780809316823

9780809316830
Personal Author:
Edition:
Paperbound ed.
Publication Information:
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, 1988-1991.
Physical Description:
17 v. <1-2, 4, 6-11, 14-17> ; 22 cm.
General Note:
Textual editors and writers of introductions vary from volume to volume.

Continues: The middle works, 1899-1924.
Contents:
Contents: v.1. 1925. Experience and nature -- v.2. 1925-1927. Essays, reviews, miscellany, and the public and its problems -- v.4. 1929. The quest for certainty. -- v.6. 1931-1932. Essays, reviews, and miscellany. -- v.7. 1932. Ethics. -- v.8. 1933. Essays and how we think, revised edition. -- v.9. 1933-1934. Essays, reviews, miscellany, and a common faith. -- v.10. 1934. Art as experience. -- v.11. 1935-1937. Essays and liberalism and social action. -- v.14. 1939-1941. Essays, reviews, and miscellany. -- v.15. 1942-1948. Essays, reviews, and miscellany. -- v.16. 1949-1952. Essays, typescripts, and knowing and the known. -- v.17. 1885-1953. Miscellaneous writings.
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Book BILKUTUP0278966 B945 .D41 1988 V.1 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278967 B945 .D41 1988 V.2 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278969 B945 .D41 1988 V.4 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278970 B945 .D41 1988 V.6 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278482 B945 .D41 1988 V.7 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278971 B945 .D41 1988 V.8 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278972 B945 .D41 1988 V.9 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278973 B945 .D41 1988 V.10 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278974 B945 .D41 1988 V.11 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278975 B945 .D41 1988 V.14 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278976 B945 .D41 1988 V.15 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278977 B945 .D41 1988 V.16 Central Campus Library
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Book BILKUTUP0278978 B945 .D41 1988 V.17 Central Campus Library
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On Order

Summary

Summary

John Dewey s "Experience and Nature "has been considered the fullest expression of his mature philosophy since its eagerly awaited publication in 1925. Irwin Edman wrote at that time that with monumental care, detail and completeness, Professor Dewey has in this volume revealed the metaphysical heart that beats its unvarying alert tempo through all his writings, whatever their explicit themes. In his introduction to this volume, Sidney Hook points out that Dewey s "Experience and Nature "is both the most suggestive and most difficult of his writings. The meticulously edited text published here as the first volume in the series The Later Works of John Dewey, 19251953 spans that entire period in Dewey s thought by including two important and previously unpublished documents from the book s history: Dewey s unfinished new introduction written between 1947 and 1949, edited by the late Joseph Ratner, and Dewey s unedited final draft of that introduction written the year before his death. In the intervening years Dewey realized the impossibility of making his use of the word experience understood. He wrote in his 1951 draft for a new introduction: Were I to write (or rewrite) "Experience and Nature "today I would entitle the book "Culture and Nature "and the treatment of specific subject-matters would be correspondingly modified. I would abandon the term experience because of my growing realization that the historical obstacles which prevented understanding of my use of experience are, for all practical purposes, insurmountable. I would substitute the term culture because with its meanings as now firmly established it can fully and freely carry my philosophy of experience. "


Summary

With the exception of "Experience and Nature, "(Volume 1 of the Later Works), this volume contains all of Dewey s writings for 1925 and 1926, as well as his 1927 book, "The Public and Its Problems. A Modern Language Association s Committee on Scholarly Editions "textual edition.The first essay in this volume, The Development of American Pragmatism, is perhaps Dewey s best-known article of these years, emphasizing the uniquely American origins of his own philosophical innovations. Other essays focus on Dewey s continuing investigation of the nature of intelligent conduct, as, for example, his debate with David Wight Prall on the underpinnings of value, his study of sense-perception, and his support for outlawing of war. Also appearing here are Dewey s final articles on the culture of the developing world, written for the "New"" Republic "after his travels to China, Turkey, and Mexico."


Summary

This volume provides an authoritative edition of Dewey s "The Quest for Certainty: A Study of the Relation Between Knowledge and Action. "The book is made up of the Gifford Lectures delivered AprilMay 1929 at the University of Edinburgh. Writing to Sidney Hook, Dewey described this work as a criticism of philosophy as attempting to attain theoretical certainty. In the "Philosophical Review "Max C. Otto later elaborated: Mr. Dewey wanted, so far as lay in his power, to crumble into dust, once and for all, the chief fortress of the classic philosophical tradition. "


Summary

Except for Dewey's and James H. Tufts' 1932 Ethics (Volume 7 of The Later Works), this volume brings together Dewey's writings for 1931#150;1932.

 

The Great Depression presented John Dewey and the American people with a series of economic, political, and social crises in 1931 and 1932 that are reflected in most of the 86 items in this volume, even in philosophical essays such as “Human Nature." As Sidney Ratner points out in his Introduction, Dewey's interest in international peace is fea­tured in the writings in this volume.


Summary

Introduction by Abraham Edel and Elizabeth FlowerThis seventh volume provides an authoritative edition of Dewey and James H. Tufts 1932 "Ethics."Dewey and Tufts state that the book s aim is: To induce a habit of thoughtful consideration, of envisaging the full meaning and consequences of individual conduct and social policies, insisting throughout that ethics must be constantly concerned with the changing problems of daily life."


Summary

This volume also includes a collection of essays entitled "The Educational Frontier, "Dewey s articles on logic, the outlawry of war, and philosophy for the "Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, "and his reviews of Alfred North Whitehead s "Adventures of Ideas, "Martin Schutze s "Academic Illusions in the Field of Letters and the Arts, "and Rexford G. Tugwell s "Industrial Discipline and the Governmental Arts.""


Summary

This ninth volume in The Later Works of John Dewey, 19251953, brings together sixty items from 1933 and 1934, including Dewey s Terry Lectures at Yale University, published as "A Common Faith."In his introduction, Milton R. Konvitz concludes that "A" "Common Faith "remains a provocative book, an intellectual teaser, an essay at religious philosophy which no philosopher can wholly bypass. Dewey concentrated much of his writing in 1933 and 1934 on issues arising from the economic crises of the Great Depression. In the early 1930s Communist activity in the New York Teachers Union increased. "The Report of the Special Grievance Committee of the Teachers Union "is published in this volume, as is Dewey s impromptu address, On the Grievance Committee s Report, made when he presented that report. Rounding out the volume are eighteen articles from the "People s Lobby Bulletin.""


Summary

"Art as Experience "evolved from John Dewey s Willam James Lectures, delivered at Harvard University from February to May 1931.In his Introduction, Abraham Kaplan places Dewey s philosophy of art within the context of his pragmatism. Kaplan demonstrates in Dewey s esthetic theory his traditional movement from a dualism to a monism and discusses whether Dewey s viewpoint is that of the artist, the respondent, or the critic."


Summary

This volume includes ninety-two items from 1935, 1936, and 1937, including Dewey s 1935 Page-Barbour Lectures at the University of Virginia, published as "Liberalism and Social Action."In essay after essay Dewey analyzed, criticized, and reevaluated liberalism. When his controversial "Liberalism and Social Action "appeared, asking whether it was still possible to be a liberal, Horace M. Kallen wrote that Dewey restates in the language and under the conditions of his times what Jefferson s Declaration of Independence affirmed in the language and under the conditions of his. The diverse nature of the writings belies their underlying unity: some are technical philosophy; other philosophical articles shade into social and political themes; social and political issues permeate the educational articles, which in turn involve Dewey s philosophical ideas."