Cover image for The Cambridge companion to Arabic philosophy
Title:
The Cambridge companion to Arabic philosophy
Author:
Adamson, Peter, 1972-
ISBN:
9780521520690
Publication Information:
Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Physical Description:
xvii, 448 p.
Subject Term:
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Book BILKUTUP0293500 B741 .C36 2006 Central Campus Library
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Summary

Summary

Representing one of the great traditions of Western philosophy, philosophy written in Arabic and in the Islamic world was inspired by Greek philosophical works and the indigenous ideas of Islamic theology. This collection of essays, by some of the leading scholars in Arabic philosophy, provides an introduction to the field by way of chapters devoted to individual thinkers (such as al-Farabi, Avicenna and Averroes) or groups, especially during the 'classical' period from the ninth to the twelfth centuries.


Table of Contents

1 Introduction Peter Adamson and Richard C. Taylor
2 Greek into Arabic: neoplatonism in translation Cristina D'Ancona
3 Al-Kindî and the reception of Greek philosophy Peter Adamson
4 Al-Fârâbî and the philosophical curriculum David Reisman
5 The Ismâ'îlîs Paul Walker
6 Avicenna and the Avicennian tradition Robert Wisnovsky
7 Al-Gazâlî Michael E. Marmura
8 Philosophy in Andalusia: Ibn Bâjja and Ibn Tufayl Josep Puig Montada
9 Averroes: religious dialectic and Aristotelian philosophical thought Richard C. Taylor
10 Suhrawardî and illuminationism John Walbridge
11 Mysticism and philosophy: Obn 'Arabî and Mullâ Sadrâ Sajjad H. Rizvi
12 Logic Tony Street
13 Ethical and political philosophy Charles E. Butterworth
14 Natural philosophy Marwan Rashed
15 Psychology: soul and intellect Deborah L. Black
16 Metaphysics Thérèse-Anne Druart
17 Islamic philosophy and Jewish philosophy Steven Harvey
18 Arabic into Latin: the reception of Arabic philosophy into Western Europe Charles Burnett
19 Recent trends in Arabic and Persian philosophy Hossein Ziai.