Cover image for Cosmopolitanism and international relations theory
Title:
Cosmopolitanism and international relations theory
Author:
Beardsworth, Richard, 1961-
ISBN:
9780745643243

9780745643236
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, UK ; Malden, MA : Polity, 2011
Physical Description:
vii, 272 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents:
The spectrum of cosmopolitanism --- The realist critique of cosmopolitanism --- A cosmopolitan response to realism --- The marxist critique of cosmopolitanism --- A cosmopolitan response to marxism --- The postmodern critique of cosmopolitanism --- A cosmopolitan response to postmodernism.
Abstract:
"Globalization has been contested in recent times. Among the critical perspectives is cosmopolitanism. Yet, with the exception of normative theory, international relations as a field has ignored cosmopolitan thinking. This book redresses this gap and develops a dialogue between cosmopolitanism and international relations. The dialogue is structured around three debates between non-universalist theories of international relations and contemporary cosmopolitan thought. The theories chosen are realism, (post-)Marxism and postmodernism. All three criticize liberalism in the international domain, and, therefore, cosmopolitanism as an offshoot of liberalism. In the light of each school's respective critique of universalism, the book suggests both the importance and difficulty of the cosmopolitan perspective in the contemporary world. Beardsworth emphasizes the need for global leadership at nation-state level, re-embedding of the world economy, a cosmopolitan politics of the lesser violence, and cosmopolitan political judgement. He also suggests research agendas to situate further contemporary cosmopolitanism in international relations theory. This book will appeal to all students of political theory and international relations, especially those who are seeking more articulation of the main issues between cosmopolitanism and its critics in international relations"--Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

Globalization has been contested in recent times. Among thecritical perspectives is cosmopolitanism. Yet, with the exceptionof normative theory, international relations as a field has ignoredcosmopolitan thinking. This book redresses this gap and develops adialogue between cosmopolitanism and international relations. Thedialogue is structured around three debates betweennon-universalist theories of international relations andcontemporary cosmopolitan thought.

The theories chosen are realism, (post-)Marxism andpostmodernism. All three criticize liberalism in the internationaldomain, and, therefore, cosmopolitanism as an offshoot ofliberalism. In the light of each school's respective critique ofuniversalism, the book suggests both the importance and difficultyof the cosmopolitan perspective in the contemporary world.Beardsworth emphasizes the need for global leadership atnation-state level, re-embedding of the world economy, acosmopolitan politics of the lesser violence, and cosmopolitanpolitical judgement. He also suggests research agendas to situatefurther contemporary cosmopolitanism in international relationstheory.

This book will appeal to all students of political theory andinternational relations, especially those who are seeking morearticulation of the main issues between cosmopolitanism and itscritics in international relations.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgementsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
1 The Spectrum of Cosmopolitanismp. 16
1 The Historical Background to the Cosmopolitan Dispositionp. 17
2 The Cosmopolitan Spectrump. 21
2.1 Cultural cosmopolitanismp. 21
2.2 Moral cosmopolitanismp. 23
2.3 Normative cosmopolitanismp. 29
2.4 Institutional cosmopolitanismp. 34
2.5 Legal cosmopolitanismp. 36
2.6 Political cosmopolitanismp. 40
3 Conclusionp. 46
2 The Realist Critique of Cosmopolitanismp. 48
1 The Major Tenets of Realismp. 49
2 Critique of Cosmopolitanismp. 56
2.1 The Realist approach to international lawp. 56
2.2 Cosmopolitan 'domination'p. 63
2.3 Humanitarian intervention and political moralismp. 66
2.4 Towards a prudent politics of limitsp. 70
3 Conclusionp. 73
3 A Cosmopolitan Response to Realismp. 75
1 The Status of the Normative in Conditions of Interdependencep. 76
2 Power, Interest and Legitimacy: A Cosmopolitan Perspectivep. 81
3 Category Errors: Domestic Analogy, 'Legalistic-Moralistic' Fallacy and Anarchyp. 90
4 Humanitarian Intervention: Towards a Cosmopolitan Realismp. 97
5 From the Principle of Sovereignty to the Principle of Subsidiarityp. 104
6 Conclusionp. 108
4 The Marxist Critique of Cosmopolitanismp. 111
1 The Major Tenets of Marxismp. 114
2 From Embedded Liberalism to Neo-liberalismp. 122
3 The Marxist Critique of Cosmopolitanismp. 128
3.1 Cosmopolitan lack of economic analysis and complicity with global liberal governancep. 130
3.2 Deep reasons for global inequality: beyond cosmopolitan surfacep. 134
3.3 The cosmopolitan substitution of ethics for politicsp. 137
3.4 Nation-state particularity contra cosmopolitan universality: the Marxist response to globalizationp. 138
4 Conclusionp. 139
5 A Cosmopolitan Response to Marxismp. 141
1 Cosmopolitan Reformismp. 144
1.1 Cosmopolitanism and the capitalist systemp. 144
1.2 Cosmopolitan reflection on the market and regulationp. 146
2 'Global Social Democracy': What Can This Concept Mean? Re-embedded Liberalismp. 153
3 The Cosmopolitan Logic of Re-embedded Liberalismp. 159
4 Global Energy Futures: Economic Dilemma and State Leadershipp. 162
5 Conclusionp. 169
6 The Postmodern Critique of Cosmopolitanismp. 172
1 Postmodernism, Modernity and IRp. 173
2 Foucault and Agamben: The Biopolitical Fate of Liberal Governmentalityp. 176
3 The Illiberal Practices of Global Liberal Governancep. 182
3.1 The politics of securityp. 182
3.2 The liberal way of warp. 183
3.3 Depoliticization of the victimp. 187
4 Jacques Derrida: Law, Democracy-to-come and Ethico-political Responsibilityp. 189
5 Conclusionp. 197
7 A Cosmopolitan Response to Postmodernismp. 199
1 The Logic of Liberal Law I: What Is Liberal Law?p. 200
2 The Logic of Liberal Law II: Cosmopolitan Response to Postmodern Reflection on Lawp. 204
3 A Politics of the Lesser Violence: Cosmopolitan Response to Illiberal Liberalismp. 210
4 Political Judgement and Risk: A Cosmopolitan Response to Derrida and his IR Legacyp. 218
5 Conclusionp. 224
Conclusion: Idealism and Realism Todayp. 227
Notesp. 238
Referencesp. 244
Indexp. 264