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Title:
The complete cities of ancient Egypt
Author:
Snape, S. R. (Steven R.), author.
ISBN:
9780500051795
Physical Description:
240 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 26 cm
General Note:
"242 illustrations, 193 in color."
Contents:
Urban life in ancient Egypt -- pt. I. The rise of the city. What is a city? -- The origins of urbanism in Egypt -- The location of cities -- Building the city -- Egyptian words for towns and cities -- Estimating population -- pt. II. Cities for kings and gods. Palaces -- Fortified cities -- Temple and city -- pt. III. Cities for people. City government -- Towns and houses of the Middle Kingdom -- Towns and houses of the New Kingdom -- Country houses -- Community centres -- Feeding and supplying the city -- Working life -- Water and sanitation -- Schools -- Crime in the city -- Leisure -- Tourism -- Death in the city -- pt. IV. Graeco-Roman Egypt. The classical city in Egypt -- Alexandria ad Aegyptum -- The Faiyum in the Graeco-Roman period -- Middle Egypt in the Graeco-Roman period -- pt. V. Gazetteer of cities and towns of ancient Egypt. Elephantine and Aswan -- Southern Egypt -- Thebes -- The Theban/Coptite region -- Middle Egypt -- Amarna: the complete city? -- Other Middle Egyptian cities -- The Faiyum -- Memphis: the shifting city -- Heliopolis: city of the sun -- The Memphite region -- The Delta: Cities of the Canopic Branch ; Cities of the Rosetta Branch ; Cities of the Damietta Branch ; Cities of the Pelusiac Branch ; Fortress-towns of the Eastern Delta and Wadi Tumilat -- Northern Sinai -- The oases -- The Mediterranean coast -- Nubia -- Epilogue: Lost cities.
Abstract:
Ancient Egyptian cities and towns have until recently been one of the least-studied and least-published aspects of this great ancient civilization. Now new research and excavation are transforming our knowledge. The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt is the first book to bring these latest discoveries to a wide general and scholarly audience, and to provide a comprehensive overview of what we know about ancient settlement during the dynastic period. Divided in two halves, the book opens with an account of the development of urban settlement in Egypt, describing the pattern of urban life, from food production, government, crime and health to schooling, leisure, ancient tourism, and the interaction of the living community with the dead. The second half of the book takes the reader on a trip down the Nile from Aswan to the Delta, giving a comprehensive account of all cities and towns with details for each of their discovery, excavation and important finds, supported by maps and plans as well as recent photographs. This book is sure to appeal to all those concerned with urban design and history, as well as tourists, students and Egyptophiles.
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Summary

Summary

Ancient Egyptian cities and towns have until recently been one of the least-studied and least-published aspects of this great ancient civilization. Now, new research and excavation are transforming our knowledge. This is the first book to bring these latest discoveries to a wide audience and to provide a comprehensive overview of what we know about ancient settlement during the dynastic period.The cities range in date from early urban centers to large metropolises. From houses to palaces to temples, the different parts of Egyptian cities and towns are examined in detail, giving a clear picture of the urban world. The inhabitants, from servants to Pharaoh, are vividly brought to life, placed in the context of the civil administration that organized every detail of their lives.Famous cities with extraordinary buildings and fascinating histories are also examined here through detailed individual treatments, including: Memphis, home of the pyramid-building kings of the Old Kingdom; Thebes, containing the greatest concentration of monumental buildings from the ancient world; and Amarna, intimately associated with the pharaoh Akhenaten. An analysis of information from modern excavations and ancient texts recreates vibrant ancient communities, providing range and depth beyond any other publication on the subject.


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