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Cover image for Legal fictions constituting race, composing literature
Title:
Legal fictions constituting race, composing literature
Author:
Holloway, Karla F. C., 1949-
ISBN:
9780822377054
Physical Description:
1 online resource (xv, 158 pages) : illustrations
Contents:
The capital in question -- Imagined liberalism -- Mapping racial reason -- Being in place : landscape, never inscape -- Secondhand tales and hearsay -- Black legibility : "Can I get a witness" -- Trying to read me -- "A novel-like tenor" -- Passing and protection -- A secluded colored neighborhood.
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eBook ER149491 PS153 .N5 H64 2014 Electronic Resources
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Summary

Summary

In Legal Fictions , Karla FC Holloway both argues that U.S. racial identity is the creation of U.S. law and demonstrates how black authors of literary fiction have engaged with the law's constructions of race since the era of slavery. Exploring the resonance between U.S. literature and U.S. jurisprudence, Holloway reveals Toni Morrison's Beloved and Charles Johnson's Middle Passage as stories about personhood and property, David Bradley's The Chaneysville Incident and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man as structured by evidence law, and Nella Larsen's Passing as intimately related to contract law. Holloway engages the intentional, contradictory, and capricious constructions of race embedded in the law with the same energy that she brings to her masterful interpretations of fiction by U.S. writers. Her readings shed new light on the many ways that black U.S. authors have reframed fundamental questions about racial identity, personhood, and the law from the nineteenth into the twenty-first centuries. Legal Fictions is a bold declaration that the black body is thoroughly bound by law and an unflinching look at the implications of that claim.


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